Throughout the course you have completed numerous self assessment tools. What are your growth areas and what specifically can you do to improve your transformation? Kelly Clark: My most important area that requires growth would be in identifying new teaching methods and putting them into regular practice. We are often given so much information in a single sitting. The ideas are often good, but implementing them becomes a challenge for me. I need to be better about selecting one strategy and employing that until I reach a level of comfort and then moving to a new method. I feel this will help me to not feel so overwhelmed and gain a sense of mastery of one thing before moving on. Kristofer Hudnall My most important growth area is attempting to break old habits of instruction. In that majority of my instruction in the past has been centralized around direct instruction. This method has suited my strengths as well as student need, but I realize that it should not be my only means of instruction. I need to allow the students to have more ownership over the learning process.

Paul Dahlkemper: For me the last area I had to improve on was having and understanding a more common vocabulary. As I went through the self assessments I found that I was doing many different things or I didn’t completely understand what the concept really meant. I have learned so much from this process. I now have that common vocabulary and I have learned it is important to step outside your comfort zone. Things are never going to work the way you in vision them, but that is no reason not to try. It is alright not to be perfect; improving is the name of the game.
Richelle Ransom: I have grown in the fact that I now incorporate a lot more of the 21st century skills into my lessons, especially regarding the use of technology. I need to continue to improve this approach though by coming up with new and innovative ways to include technology, inquiry-based activities, project-based activities, etc. I always like the idea of doing it, but when it comes to actually attempting to generate the new lessons involving these and many other techniques for some reason I just don't...possibly because in some instances I may not fully understand how to make it/them functional in the real classroom environment. (Great idea, now what do I do with it?) I need to work on forcing myself to take that next step and develop more of these activities for my classes.
Jason Falk: This year, the new technology implemented in my room has definitely changed things for the better. I've grown in my use of that technology not only to present info. but to provide some activities that are rich in 21st century skills. I still could improve on this, obviously, as it kind of drives me crazy if I'm doing something the best it can be done. What I think I need to do mainly is just have time to think about the different topics I teach so I could plan much more activities in advance. The idea of these projects interest me, but I think I'm going to struggle doing that as well as making sure I accomplish the PPSA-based curriculum, because I'm not sure how "applied to real life" a lot of those questions are. It's hard enough fitting that in.
Brian Emick: I have definitely grown in the areas of technology and the incorporation of technology in my daily lessons. I am excited about the fact that I have so many great teaching tools at my disposal in my efforts to make math more exciting and relevant for the students. I continue to look for new ways to develop successful learning in my classroom. It has been a challenging road with all of the change taking place. I'm sure the challenges will continue as our school grows and moves further into the 21st century. However, I am glad to be part of a group that is proactive and always is attempting to do what is best for the students.
One growth area would be to incorporate more projects, both group and individual, into my classes. The biggest problem I have with group projects is grading them. Trying to give a fair grade to each individual in the group is a problem that I have to address. Lou Benko
Jen Fetcko: I completey agree with Kris. My most important growth area is to differentiate my teaching methods. I use what worked for me when I was a student. It seems like when I do something different in my classroom, the students are too dependent on me for instruction, so I think that is why I haven't changed in that aspect. I have however grown throughout this course in the sense that I have begun to incorporate more of the 21st century technology into my lessons and students respond well to it.
Jan Lindsey: Probably my strongest area of growth is my recognition of the need for collaboration. Although I have always felt willing to do so, and knew that it was beneficial for me, I was not aware of the great benefit of all, especially the student. Specifically, I want to take the time to work with my department and the other faculty in a
Paul Cousins:Now to do this for the second time! I believe that I am completely aware that we need to become facilitators as opposed to dictators! Our 21st Century students need to become more hands on and I agree. I think it sucks when we have these people come in for inservice and all they do is babble! Get real! After a while, all I hear is waaaa waaaa waaa waaaa and they're soon to hear ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ! I'm glad to know that I was doing some of this stuff already.The kids have already used the smartboard and we are becoming masters of the laptop (once we have logged on). But there is a ton of work to do by a ton of people to make this whole thing work! I have been working hard to change and will continue to do so.
Heather Peters: I feel that my strongest growth has been becoming more in tune with what will excite my students and make them more curious when learning. From the strategies we’ve learned to the various resources made available to us, I have been busy trying to improve my lessons so that they really reach my students. I can see so much improvement in their skills and that is exciting for me. There are so many more changes I want to make, so seeing that it is making a difference encourages me to keep going.
Shane McIntyre: I feel I’ve grown in technology some, I know I need to work on finding ways to implement it into the classroom more. I feel overwhelmed with all the info and sites, to try and implement there seems to be so many and to try and find time to search and review them. I know I also need to try and implement some of the new teaching methods covered in the course; that seems to be the biggest obstacle I need to over come

What can you do to improve teacher interaction? Kelly Clark: I feel that I have positive interaction with my fellow teachers. To encourage the progression of teacher interaction, I think that regular and open dialogue is necessary. I try to contact teachers regularly that deal with students on my caseload and show them respect for the control that they have over their own classroom while also trying to ensure that I follow special ed law so that I don't end up in a bind. I feel this is a big hurdle for me. I never want to interfere in the function of someone's classroom, but my job requires certain things by law. It becomes a slippery slope. However, I feel that, if I continually approach my peers with respect for the fantastic things they are doing, I have always gotten respect in return. We really truly have a wonderful group of teachers in this building who really care about kids. Kristofer Hudnall I need to leave my room more. I also should ask more questions of those I work with. Paul Dahlkemper: I need to get out of my room and share more. I have a great deal of respect for all my fellow teachers, and we all have something of value to contribute. This is a team process and I need to take a more active role rather than just be a follower. We all share the same goal of doing what is best for our kids, and we can learn from each other on what is the best way to do that. Richelle Ransom: I also have a great deal of respect for my fellow teachers. Unfortunately I don't get to interact with them as much as I should, or would like to. When I do get the opportunity to discuss various topics with them it is always a positive result, but like many I think I get "trapped" in my own little corner of the building, and don't get out much...contact is limited. I think we need to create more times that teachers can come together and share ideas. Once everyone gets comfortable with it, a wikispace may be one way to do this, or possibly a few face-to-face meetings. BP: Maybe we should try department meetings or building meetings for those interested. We could set a specific day of the week and offer any interested faculty members to attend and listen, to attend and share or to attend and ask questions. After and Act 80 Day might be the perfect time to meet for an additional 15 - 20 minutes. What do all of you think? Richelle Ransom: I think a 15-20 minute meeting, or a few of them to start, would be a good idea. At least until everyone got comfortable with the idea of sharing information via the internet, etc. And, if we could fit it in on an Act 80 Day, even better. Lou Benko; Monthly department meetngs during school time would be very valuable to attain consistency with the curricullum. Jason Falk: I guess what I can do individually is simply initiate more interaction with other teachers. It's hard of course to get chances to do that, especially with teachers that are not close in proximity to my own room. I do like the idea of some organized meetings. I think that would be beneficial, and it doesn't matter to me if they're during Act 80, regular school days, or after school.

Brian Emick: Teacher interaction for my specific department could take place much easier if each of our classrooms were closer together. That is one negative as far as where are classrooms are located around the building. There would be much more collaboration in our department if our rooms were closer. In addition, regular department meetings could be held to promote teacher collaboration throughout the building.

Shane McIntyre: I feel I’ve grown in technology some, I know I need to work on finding ways to implement it into the classroom more. I feel overwhelmed with all the info and sites, to try and implement there seems to be so many and to try and find time to search and review them. I know I also need to try and implement some of the new teaching methods covered in the course; that seems to be the biggest obstacle I need to over come

Paul Cousins: I often wonder how far we are away from "BIg Brother" (video cameras) in our classrooms! I invite anyone to come down and observe me! But how many of us are comfortable with others in our room. We all have "down" time at some point in a particular lesson where the kids are doing some independent work. What will they think if I'm not using my smartboard 79 and 1/2 minutes a class period???? It would be shame if some of us didn't get a chance to see Jodi Freeburg in action before she retires. I ask the "Golden Boy" Humphreys for advice from time-to-time and he's another one of many that we could learn a thing or two from. Most of us would benefit from just talking about what works and what doesn't. When will we have the time?

Jen Fetcko: I feel that the teachers in our district have a very positive interaction with one another. I think that we all feel comfortable enough to ask questions and seek advice from each other. It would be nice to have more time for departments to collaborate to work on lessons and activities together.

Heather Peters: I strongly want to improve the amount of interaction I have not only with my own department but also with the rest of the school. Some weeks it’s so hard to get out of my room, but once I do I’m glad I did. We have so much to learn from one another. It’s exciting to find out what techniques others are using or hear the successes others are experiencing. I think it needs to be more than just a five minute conversation in passing, though. I love the idea of having a set day and time for some real interaction that we can all come prepared with things to share. It would help strengthen our overall vision and unity.

Kristofer Hudnall I need to leave my room more. I also should ask more questions of those I work with.

What can you do to improve stakeholder communication? Kelly Clark: I think we need to keep seeking out and fostering communication with families and community members. It is the only way for others to understand what goes on here from day to day. We need to advocate for our profession and for our students. We need to provide our students with linkages to outside agencies and support for employment and training after graduation.

Paul Dahlkemper: I need to continue to use the tools of communication that we have established but in a more effective manner. I need to communicate with all the stakeholders better. I need to do more for my students in this process. Allow them to have the access to the materials that will allow them to succeed both in the classroom and in the outside world.
Richelle Ransom: I think that in the building we do a decent job of communicating important information that will lead to the success of the students in our classrooms. However, I think that we need to continue to generate new ways of communicating with parents and other members of our community. In the past few years we have been making strides in this area with more opportunities for parents and other community members to visit the school and see what is happening here; we just need to continue and possibly expand these efforts.
Lou Benko; More notices in the school letter on what is happening in my classes. The calendar on ed-line is up to date but I don't see most of the parents or students accessing ed-line.
Jason Falk: I have to keep in mind that there is already some indirect forms of communication. Lou mentioned the news letter and edline. It's tough because keeping stuff like that going is another "ball I have to keep in the air" as I juggle everything else. Talking to people face to face in the community, whether parents or whoever, is tough because I don't live in this community, and most of the time I see parents is at extracurricular stuff, and academics is rarely a part of the conversation. It is important that we find ways to get the parents on the same page so that they will do more to support us and push their kids to excel.

Brian Emick: By using the software that has been provided to us (GradeQuick, Edline, etc...) we can certainly keep a strong line of communication open with parents and even our students. There are other forms of communication that take place, including the letters home, the newsletter, the marquee in front of the building... We just need to continue to make ourselves aware of the fact that communication is a vital part of the educational process and a component that all teachers need to make time for.
Paul Cousins:Oh I love this one! If this is so important to the success of our 21st Century learner, then I'm sure, that the powers that be will coordinate all of the key players. To get me there, I would need Act 48 hours,needs hours, money, chicken wings or something.I'm not trying to be difficult but I'm spending an additional 6-10 hours, Mon-Thu. just adapting my lessons now.The key players, other than teachers, administrators,and parents, have to be community members. They need to be community members that need globally competitive workers in their workplace not just anyone that has Wednesdays open!
Jen Fetcko: More department collaboration (during school hours) when it comes to developing lessons and activities in each subject. Doubt it will happen, but one can hope right?

Shane McIntyre: Get involved more and share more with others. Try and get out of my class more. Try and communicate with external shareholders more.
Heather Peters: As difficult as it may be, I think we’re going to have to commit more of our own personal time for collaboration. I don’t want to sound negative, but I chuckled when I read in one of the articles that “time during the workday must be found and allocated for department meetings and must be a top priority supported from all levels of administration and the community…this is a NON-NEGOTIABLE component.” I just don’t see us receiving release time to complete departmental collaboration meetings. If we want it to happen it has to start with us committing some of our own time. Perhaps once administration sees how committed we are to it, maybe they’ll give us time. On the other hand, it could backfire and they say that if it’s working why change it. Either way, we have to make a decision as to whether or not it’s worth it for the good of our students.
Kristofer Hudnall Involving parents has always been a strength of mine. I should do a better of job of attempting to involve more people and concerned parties other parents.
Jan Lindsey: Shareholders are being reached (as Shane has mentioned); I know as a parent (a shareholder within my children's community), it is sometimes difficult to prioritize and evaluate all the communication I am receiving. Perhaps if we could have a thematic goal throughout the year (such as our "Take pride in your work" that we have here at the high school), it would allow a centralized focus on what is important for this time.

How can you contribute to the shared vision and departmental activities? Kelly Clark: I will practice what I preach. I will continue an open and honest discussion with my fellow teachers. I will talk in the community whenever the situation presents itself and promote our school and our students at any opportunity.

Paul Dahlkemper: I often times feel that I am still “wet behind the ears” and just sit back and listen and learn. I now know that the time for that is over and I must start to take on a more leadership role rather than a follower. My department all has the same vision and we work closely to helping our students succeed. We need to get our community involved and understand our vision and join in to be successful.
Richelle Ransom: I will attempt to communicate more often with other members of the faculty, and share some of the techniques that have been successful in classroom. If necessary I will help explain the importance of moving from the traditional way of teaching to the 21st Century way of teaching, and give other teachers suggestions on how to make the required changes. The most important thing any of us can do is communicate, either face-to-face, or by some other means. Only then can we all reach our common goal/shared vision.
Lou Benko;
Regullar meeting with the department to assure that we are all on the same page. We don't even use the samr formatting for the senior papers.
Jason Falk: I can continue to do my part in the classroom to the best of my ability. When we meet as a department, I can initiate some discussions that will get us collaborating on how best to reach our goals within the shared vision. I could try to remember to bring some things to share and get the ball rolling, maybe even write up a "shared vision" itinerary.
Brian Emick: I will remain an active participant in the various happenings around the school. When opportunities to present themselves to get involved, I will get involved to assist in creating that notion of a shared vision. I will also look to seek out more input from other teachers around the building when looking for new ideas to try in the classroom.

Jen Fetcko: More department collaboration (during school hours) when it comes to developing lessons and activities in each subject. Doubt it will happen, but one can hope right?
Shane McIntyre: Get involved more and share more with others. Try and get out of my class more. Try and communicate with external shareholders more.
Heather Peters: As difficult as it may be, I think we’re going to have to commit more of our own personal time for collaboration. I don’t want to sound negative, but I chuckled when I read in one of the articles that “time during the workday must be found and allocated for department meetings and must be a top priority supported from all levels of administration and the community…this is a NON-NEGOTIABLE component.” I just don’t see us receiving release time to complete departmental collaboration meetings. If we want it to happen it has to start with us committing some of our own time. Perhaps once administration sees how committed we are to it, maybe they’ll give us time. On the other hand, it could backfire and they say that if it’s working why change it. Either way, we have to make a decision as to whether or not it’s worth it for the good of our students.
Paul Cousins: we have a good group already. We just need to get everyone on board for this to work. Imagine yourself as the student! "I'm going to be active and participate in this class because I feel as if I'm an active participant in my learning process" And next period I'm going to listen to some babble because they are in the 20th Century! I've always been a team player for those that want to play on a team! But we need everyone on board for this to work! Not just 14 of us!
Kristofer Hudnall like Richelle I will attempt to communicate more with faculty. I will elicit suggestions and may even observe another teacher if given the oppurtunity.
Jan Lindsey: Be more proactive with the shared vision. If I don't feel it is being promoted or implemented, find out what role I can have to further the cause. Talk with other stakeholders to see where the difficulties are (time, understanding, knowledge), and see if I can improve these areas.